EU and No-EU: From the Centre to the Margin

Fablevision and its director, Elizabeth Gardiner, feature in Creative Europe’s review of European projects, “Stories From Creative Europe In The UK – 2014-2020”.

One of the great things about the greatest European project – the European Union – was its role in fostering a feeling of co-operation, friendship and interrelatedness among its constituent parts – 28 sovereign nation states sharing a commitment to the same future and direction. Amity had replaced enmity.

It was in this regard and spirit that Fablevision joined Intercult (Gothenburg and Stockholm, Sweden), Municipality of Levadia (Levadia, Greece), Nabaltyckie Centrum Kultury (Gdansk, Poland), Ormston House (Limerick, Ireland) and Stad Oostende (Oostende, Belgium) in the Memory of Water EU project, which explored the nature of heritage, urban regeneration and renewal in post-industrial riverine and seaboard communities. At its heart was the use of artistic interventions/residences to help explore, encourage and engage with communities which have often been ignored or sidelined. It asked the question: who decides the future of such places? The question needs asking as more often than not regeneration of post-industrial places and spaces involves the imposition of “solutions” without reference to the heritage of these places or engagement with the communities who live there.

Then came 23rd June, 2016 and Brexit. It remains to be seen what the level of engagement between the UK and EU-based cultural organisations will be post-Brexit. However, one thing is certain, there is now no common narrative or direction of travel. Aside from the obvious dislocation and disengagement, the UK and its organisations will no longer have access to the same level of cultural funding or the same access to the skills, knowledge and experience of our erstwhile European partners. It is already the case that interns and cultural professionals are not finding Britain as welcoming and easy to access as it once was.

Fablevision continues to work with European partners – notably Intercult (Sweden) and Mariupol Platform TU (Ukraine) – as part of the Woven Network project, and Bridging Digital, with organisations from Sweden, Greece and Poland, on how the community cultural sector in Europe is adapting post-pandemic.

What is now less clear is what the future holds for Scottish cultural organisations now that the UK is outwith the largest market and culturally dynamic bloc in the world.

Memory of Water EU Shortlisted for New Bauhaus Prize 2021

The Memory of Water EU project, on which Fablevision (Govan, Glasgow) worked with Ormston House (Limerick), the Municipality of Levadia (Levadia, Greece), Nadbałtyckie Centrum Kultury (Gdansk), Intercult (Gothenburg and Stockholm) and Stad Oostende (Oostende, Belgium), has been nominated and shortlisted for the European Commision’s New Bauhaus Prize 2021.

The artist-led project explored new approaches to urban regeneration, cultural planning and placemaking in post-industrial, waterside or riverine locations.

Awakening The River

The film entitled, “Awakening The River”, is a collaboration between Fablevision, who co-ordinated the project, STAGE (Scottish Talent Across Generations Events), and the Greek Memory of Water EU artist, Ira Brami.

Directed and produced by Helen Kyle, the film provides a narrative of poems, music and photographs to evoke something of the essence of the river which has played such an important part in Govan and Glasgow’s history. Contributors include: “The Greatest Iron Ship” by Danny Kyle; “Clota, Goddess of the Clyde” performed by Louise Oliver; “Fear” by Kahlil Gibran (translated and performed by Michael Dempster) and “Braw Sailing on the Sea” by the Iona Fyfe Trio.